Edison & Ford Winter Estates
Highlights Thomas Edison and Henry Ford’s extraordinary contributions to science and industry.
Edison&Ford_Edison&Ford_400
Must Do Recommends
The Butterfly Estates Fort Myers FL Monarch Butter The Butterfly Estates
Educational tours are offered daily in a hands-on, natural park atmosphere promoting conservation.

Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) S Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (C.R.O.W.)
Daily Wonders of Wildlife presentations, animal ambassadors, interactive displays, videos and “critter cams.”
Pelican in Flight Ding Darling 640Southwest Florida Museum of History, Fort Myers FLnaples-zoo-tiger-640Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) SEdison&Ford_EdisonEstate_640Edison&Ford_FordEstate_640The Butterfly Estates Fort Myers River District FLsanibel-historical-villageSeminole Casino Immakalee poker, cards and gamblinSeminole Casino Immakalee couple playing slot machostego-bay-marine-science-center

Fort Myers top 10 Attractions

It is no stretch to say there is something for everyone who visits the Fort Myers Beach area. The vacation attractions throughout Fort Myers, Sanibel Island and Captiva offer a combination of natural paradise, unique history and an unlimited amount of things to do.

Be sure to check the COUPONS tab at the top of the page for great savings on area Attractions!

Edison & Ford Winter Estates
Explore nine historic buildings including Henry Ford’s home and Thomas Edison’s main house. In 1886, inventor Thomas Edison purchased land along the Caloosahatchee River in Fort Myers and constructed a winter home ...read more

Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (C.R.O.W.)
Established in 1968, the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (C.R.O.W.) is one of the nation’s leading rehabilitation hospitals for native and migratory wildlife. This unique visitor education center features daily ...read more

Southwest Florida Museum of History
History comes alive with numerous tours, displays, exhibits and artifacts about Southwest Florida and its early settlers at the Southwest Florida Museum of History. Explore the history of the Paleo period, ...read more

Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center
Explore the natural marine life of Ostego Bay through exhibits, hands-on activities, and touch tanks. Many of the center's aquatic species only come out at feeding time, so be sure to call ahead for the daily feeding ...read more

The Butterfly Estates
Located in the beautiful Downtown Fort Myers River District, the glass Butterfly Conservatory with cascading waterfalls, lush tropical nectar gardens and butterflies, is a delight to visitors. Read The Butterfly Estates featured ...read more

Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens
Hand-feed a giraffe! Discover rarely seen species like Malagasy Fosas or a Komodo dragon. While you may have seen the viral video about the African honey badgers, you can now see them in person at the Naples Zoo; these fierce ...read more

Seminole Casino Immokalee
Put Lady Luck to the test at the number one attraction in Southwest Florida.  Seminole Casino Immokalee is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. With over 1,200 ...read more

Sanibel Historical Village & Museum
The Museum was founded in 1984 with a mission to preserve, protect and share Sanibel Island history. The village and museum are a tribute to the early pioneers who homesteaded Sanibel Island in 1888. The village is comprised of ...read more

J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge
J.N. Ding Darling is part of the largest undeveloped mangrove ecosystem in the United States. This 6,400-acre refuge is home to more than 270 types of birds, 35 species of mammals, and 60 different reptiles and amphibians and is ...read more

Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum
See more than 30 exhibits featuring mollusks from around the world. The Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum provides education on shells and mollusks (the shell makers) with exhibits, educational programs, library services and ...read more

Nature in the Fort Myers Area

Exquisite beaches, mangrove forests, marine estuaries and more, all brimming with wildlife and subtropical flora, are right at your fingertips in Fort Myers. Featuring more than 300 species of birds, the Fort Myers area was named the best place for birding in the country by USA Today. Just like other visitors from the north, many birds make their winter home in Southwest Florida. You can catch these feathered friends on a hike, walk, bike or kayak in one of the area’s many refuges and preserves. Watch Eagles on Pine Island. At 17 miles long, this is Florida's largest island of the western Gulf coast. Just 15 minutes from Cape Coral, this amazing island actually consists of five very different communities. In the middle of these communities is Little Pine Island, a preserve and wetland restoration project in progress. There are 25 pairs of American Bald Eagles who nest here, as well as osprey, spoonbills, herons, ibis and egrets. You'll also spot manatees and dolphins in the surrounding waters.

 

Fort Myers Historical Locations

History enthusiasts will discover just as much to fascinate them. Native Americans, pirates and world-famous inventors have all called the Fort Myers area home. The Calusa Indians ruled Southwest Florida for thousands of years before the arrival of famed Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon in the early 1500s. Meaning “the fierce people,” the Calusa lived in communal houses, some big enough to hold 2,000 people. Communal garbage mounds of discarded shells called middens can still be seen today. The shell mounds mark the highest elevation in the area and most of Useppa Island is on reclaimed land, built up by the compacting of discarded shells over hundreds of years. Accessible only by boat, Mound Key is now a state park and a significant archeological site. 

Sanibel Island

Sanibel Island’s oldest structure is a popular attraction you'll want to visit—and photograph. Everyone does. The Sanibel Lighthouse has a unique open tower, designed to weather hurricane-force winds, allowing them to pass through the structure without causing major damage. The original grounds included two identical lighthouse keeper's dwellings, a storehouse, an oil house (which provided the fuel ... later changed to gas and then electricity), and a wharf. Today, you can fish from the lighthouse pier, wander the nature trails and watch the sun rise or set in the tranquil park. The houses, however, are homes to employees who maintain the buildings and grounds, and are off limits. As for the lighthouse, it is best appreciated from the outside looking in. 

One attraction no one should miss is watching the sunsets. Whether it’s a January day with an average high of 73 degrees or a steamy summer night with temperatures in the 90s, the sun still shines incredibly. The warmth of its orange-red hues will caress you long after your vacation is completed. 

Full of extraordinary natural attractions and unequaled history, the Fort Myers area will leave you amazed and enriched.

See more things to do in Fort Myers, Sanibel Island and Captiva Island and check out Sarasota and Naples